Categories

Monday, 10 April 2017

Running Blind by M.J. Arlidge (DI Helen Grace, #0.6) - Book Review

4/5 Stars

There's a dark secret lurking amid the quiet fields of Hampshire,

one that Helen is determined to uncover...


Edition: Kindle
Pages: 101 (Roughly.)
Chapters: 41
Publisher: Penguin

Book Links: Goodreads
                      Amazon
                      Author's Facebook

Review

Love a complex heroine that lives in the dark, depressing dwellings of evil? I do, and Helen Grace is one of the brightest. Running Blind, a solid short story that expands the series' protagonist's origins, is extremely enjoyable. Filled to the brim with morality, self-discovery, and, of course, the prerequisite doses of adrenaline-infused action, it's a novella with bite.

So I invite you to take a trip to England's Southampton during the early 90s, and witness rookie officer Helen Grace as she dodges her past and problematic persons in her present to fulfil her passion for justice. 

It's a juicy tidbit that'll have you salivating for the new core instalment, Love Me Not, which releases next month.

Sunday, 2 April 2017

The Caller by Chris Carter (Robert Hunter, #8) - Book Review

4.5/5 Stars

Your life is on the line...


Edition: Kindle
Pages: 480
Chapters: 94
Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Book Links: Goodreads
                      Amazon
                      Author's Website

Review

So, I've been MIA for a couple months, thanks to a combination of busyness and laziness and falling out with reading. But I'm back (for how long, who knows, I'm a flighty buggar), and while I might not have been the most voracious reader in recent weeks, I did keep up with some of the series I'm in the middle of.

Enter The Caller, entry number eight to Carter's Robert Hunter series.

Released in February, I knew that when I jumped back on the reading and blogging bandwagons, a sadistic, clever, and terrifying thriller definitely had to be what I went for. 

And went for I did.

Why I derive such enjoyment from this type of fiction while being an overly emotional coward I'll never know, but easing myself back in with The Caller has worked wonders. Carter never fails to create unique plots with psychological insanity and mind-bending detective work. Brutal and unforgiving, this instalment to the series further cements the author's sheer talent for criminal fiction.

Saturday, 21 January 2017

Devil's Due by Rachel Caine (Red Letter Days, #2) - Book Review

4/5 Stars

The psychic world will never be the same again...

But what are the consequences of defying destiny...?


Edition: Paperback
Pages: 329
Chapters: 17 (Plus a prologue and an epilogue)
Publisher: Harlequin Mira

Book Links: Goodreads
                      Amazon
                      Author's Website

Review

Destiny + Supernatural + Action + Romance + Choice + Consequences = Devil's Due.

And if you're not sold yet, let me continue: Devil's Due is a fast, fiery paranormal thriller with a vibrant cast and streamlined writing. It's rife with thought-provoking themes, but never lets them overtake the overall fun and flirty nature that the novel embodies. 

It doesn't top its predecessor, Devil's Bargain, but it does close the duology with vigour.

You'd be remiss if you let this little series pass you by, and by remiss, I mean you'd miss out on laughs, adrenaline-fuelled fights, and earth-shattering conspiracies for world domination.

Sunday, 15 January 2017

Private Delhi by James Patterson (Private, #13) - Book Review

3.5/5 Stars

Plastic barrels containing dissolved human remains have been found in the basement of a house.

But this isn't just any house, this property belongs to the state government.

With information suppressed by the authorities, delving too deep could make Santosh a target to be eliminated...


Edition: Kindle
Pages: 380 (roughly)
Chapters: 112
Publisher: Cornerstone Digital

Book Links: Goodreads
                      Amazon
                      Author's Website

Review

I've been anticipating another collaboration between James Patterson and Ashwin Sanghi since reading their earlier team effort Private India. My wishes, as is obvious, have been answered in the form of entry number thirteen to Patterson's Private series: Private Delhi.

Equally obvious is the fact I might have over-anticipated the novel. It doesn't quite live up to my experience with Private India, but it is by no means a slouch. Private Delhi is a clever political thriller that displays cutting conspiracies and rich gluttony.

It does stumble in its first half as it falls victim to a lot of telling over showing. Characters are a mixed bag, and the pace and writing don't solidify until the latter half of the book. 

Saturday, 14 January 2017

The Subtle Knife by Philip Pullman (His Dark Materials, #2) - Book Review

4.5/5 Stars

In the mysterious Torre degli Angeli lurks Cittagazze's most important secret

- an object which people from many worlds would kill to possess...


Edition: Paperback
Pages: 341
Chapters: 15
Publisher: Scholastic

Book Links: Goodreads
                      Amazon
                      Author's Website

Review

SPOILER WARNING

Normally I try to avoid any spoilers and keep my opinion specific but general, if that makes the least bit of sense. But sometimes there comes a story that just cannot be contained or condensed; a story that has your synapses firing and blood pumping.

The Subtle Knife is one such story.

Pullman's children's/young adult/adult tale continues in the second instalment to His Dark Materials trilogy, and yes, I listed all age ranges because the story pretty much caters to all. It's a coming-of-age bonanza set in fantasy worlds with an epic plot that doesn't fail to consume. It has some serious themes and recurring messages that unflinchingly wage war on religious doctrine and fanatical theology.

In short, The Subtle Knife betters what starts in Northern Lights and provides a thought-provoking experience that's not easily shaken.